goals, motivation, performance, personal development, planning, productivity, success, time management, time usage, Uncategorized

Summarising. Planning. Organising.

This year was bad for many people but I think, and hope, we are more optimistic than ever before looking forward to the new year. Some say that their experience tells them the next year may be even worse but what do we really know? We all learnt the lesson that it’s hard or even impossible to predict … well, anything! Yet we have vaccines and emergency antibody treatments for covid-19 now, and modern technology and developments in medicine indicate that we should worry less and suggest that things should get better. Surely media coverage doesn’t help, but remember that tragic news sells a lot better than good news.

As they say, we don’t see the world as it really is but as we want to see it.

The more you focus on positive things such as your interests, helping others, exercising and spending time with supportive and inspiring people (even if only online), the better and more positive you will feel.

SUMMARISING. PLANNING. ORGANISING.

These are some of my favourite words.

What did I learn from previous years? What mistakes did I make while planning?

LENTGHY LISTS

Quite often I ended up complicating my goals too much – by listing too many of them and then breaking them down into more steps and aspects, and that was just too much. Often, in January or other months, I simply didn’t have time to go back to these lengthy lists to check my progress.

Highlight 1-3 goals that are the most important for you and try to focus on them more.

If you end up with a lengthy list then it’s good to book some days or a weekend off every quarter to go through it, reflect on it and if necessary, make adjustments. Don’t just say: I will check this around the end of March. Put the date in your calendar. Block some time to actually do it.

I think it’s also great to send yourself reminders/summaries of goals by emailing your future self. I use www.futureme.org but I know there are a few other similar websites too. You can send yourself some reflection or write down what’s happening in your life right now and send it to yourself, say, in five years! How exciting is that?!

MAGICAL DATE

The 1st January shouldn’t be a magical date and it’s okay to start your goals in March, September or even at the end of December! We tend to focus so much on the 1st January that it’s almost like we feel things will get partly done on their own as we have the impression that Future Me will definitely be more energetic, healthy, optimistic, and so on … Also, if we don’t manage to do something on the 1st or 2nd of January we already feel like failures. Did you know that over 90% of people give up on their New Year’s resolutions by the end of January each year?!

The changes must be small or creating new habits won’t work. It can take from 30 to … over 200 days to create new habits or turn the bad ones into good ones, according to different research studies. No wonder many people give up quickly when they don’t see results. It’s hard but it’s doable.

Start implementing little changes but consistently.

TIME

We allow ourselves too little time for accomplishing goals while not properly fitting in time for emergencies and other things that come up as we live. According to some clever books on time usage, we shouldn’t make plans for at least 40% of our time because it will be swallowed up by unexpected things – a call from a friend, a visit to the doctor, feeling unwell, an unplanned trip, etc.

PLANNING YOUR BREAKS

Except for holidays at Christmas or going abroad to visit family, or a day off for a child’s birthday, I never planned an occasional day or days off just to re-charge and focus and relax (without travelling and visiting others). And this can help so much with energy levels and motivation during the year. I decided to take at least a day or a few days off every 2-3 months just to have more time for myself and my family. It would be great to fit in a block of time summarising goals and reflecting on them in such quieter ME TIME.

DEADLINE!

On the one hand, while planning, I often gave myself too much time with no deadlines or no clear deadline, even though I knew they are important. I sort of struggled to predict how much time something might take me to accomplish it. When you have two jobs and small children there is so much unpredictability and change in your life! Sometimes, on the other hand, I tried to implement the opposite, and gave myself too little time to do something that would take me a lot longer.

The best way is to do some research and also speak to people who achieved similar goals – how long did it take them? Someone managed to do a course in two months. Okay, great, but the next, even more important, step is to find out whether their circumstances are similar to yours. Probably not. We are all different. A deadline doesn’t have to be perfect if you have no idea how much time it may take you to do something but you need to learn by trial and error what may be most suitable for you. So go ahead and think it through, and put at least some reminders and deadlines in your calendar.

CHANGES!

It’s frustrating if you need to change your goals or cannot finish them completely but then we are living in this culture and society in which finishing projects and completing goals is highly prized. We try to teach our children that things have to be finished. However, this year I asked myself: why? We don’t need to finish everything just for the sake of finishing it. We don’t need to finish an exercise from a textbook if we don’t feel it’s useful. We don’t need to carry on fighting about goals that we realised are probably not as desirable as we used to think.

At the end of the year, I no longer check only what goals from December the previous year I managed to accomplish but also what I have ACHIEVED this year. We may not meet all or even half of our goals, but also last December we possibly didn’t know all the people we know now and their impact on our life; neither did we know many things that were going to affect us. All these factors sometimes make us come up with new aims and accomplish things we didn’t think of before. What I’m saying is you might not have met any of your goals but still achieved a lot during the year!

Happy New Year!

Attention & concentration, planning, productivity, time usage, Uncategorized

How do you keep yourself organised?

I hope you enjoyed my previous post about de-cluttering. I’m really passionate about a few things: personal development, education and organising! I can see that all of these interests are strictly related to my love of books and stationery, so it is not a coincidence.

One of the things that is quite new in this decade compared with how older generations used to store their documents is:

1.    We are apparently more digital because of the Internet and emails so we should use less paper. However, going paperless doesn’t really work well as lots of office workers still produce enormous amounts of paperwork, since we have emails and printers everywhere – we have more bits of paper created, not fewer. Also, nowadays many families have printers at home too!

2.    We get tonnes of leaflets and business cards. And there are so many forms that need printing and completing on paper before they are sent back to schools, doctors and various organisations.

These are only some of the reasons why we get more and more papers to organise.

The author of The Paper Solution said that she likes to use her digital calendar on her phone as it can link with other people’s calendars such as her husband’s, so they can see their plans and appointments easily, for example. It helps her to feel more organised and limits her usage of paper.

Of course, it is a matter of what’s most convenient for everyone. I prefer paper calendars. I tried digital calendars and productivity apps, and apps that should help me to manage my projects but I really feel that paper works better for me for things like tasks. I like to use a pen and I like to handwrite some things.

I have one big calendar on my fridge. Every year I purchase the same one at the end of December. It’s called Do It All Mum Family Planner. It’s brilliant! It has a magnet for the fridge and a pocket where I keep some business cards or pieces of docs such as appointments, and a pen or two. You can see find this great calendar here: https://amzn.to/3nWUE8P

I also print an Excel spread sheet with my working hours and appointments every two weeks as I have a few part-time jobs and some of my working hours are quite flexible and change every week. I do part-time admin, and I’m a photographer. I also teach foreigners English online, and I design and sell T-shirts in my Etsy shop: shorturl.at/fAYZ8

And I also have Instagram and Fb pages called Paper or Scissors – with kids’ activities ❤️

So yes, with so many projects and work, I don’t like to skip from one workbook in Excel to another or from one folder to another although I have to have some folders for my photography work and material for my online student tutorials. I also have one Action plan in Excel but it just didn’t work for me for too long and I don’t like to use it.

I have separate drawers for different jobs and projects but I also have some lists where I jot down all my projects or create a mind map to see where I am, to ensure I don’t forget something important. Doing a lot of different tasks means that you need to be quite organised and have some systems that work well for you. If you tried something and it didn’t work don’t get discouraged. It took me quite a while to learn what sort of calendars and methods and solutions I can and should use. I tried many different types of calendars before. I decided I can’t use a paper calendar in the form of a notebook. It has to be big and clearly visible, on the fridge or on the wall. Such a calendar is great for appointments and important reminders, but it isn’t big enough to cover lists with tasks. There are so many notes in my calendar that no-one except me can read it easily in our home. So that’s way I do the spread sheet which looks as simple as this:

w/c 22.10MonTueWedThursFriSatSun
7am       
8am       
9am       
10am       
11am       
        
Up to 8pm       

I glue it on the wall in the kitchen where we look when we prepare breakfast – it’s so important things are not forgotten so easily! Most days I have exercises booked at 7am but it doesn’t mean it always happens. If I need to sleep longer and my children are still asleep then I listen to my body and sleep for a bit longer (doesn’t happen often though). If my children get up at 6am this means that I probably won’t manage to exercise much that day. So any work that I have to do this week, such as admin, a photo session, or English classes, is in this spread sheet. I also take French lessons with my daughter, so these are always there too. Additionally, I would put there any appointments or meetings, such as visits to the dentist, so my husband will know that I won’t be at home then.

To make it clearer, I highlight all admin work in red, all English lessons as blue and appointments and other important things like that in green or yellow. I’ve tried so many systems and this works just perfectly. It may look like a bit of work but it isn’t, because I save the previous completed spread sheet and only every two weeks make little changes to it. Sometimes the simplest solutions are the best.

And then I have a to-do list that I update as regularly as I can. Sometimes I’d follow the method to write three tasks for each day but then it feels a bit robotic. Some days I feel I want to have more freedom and more free time, because when I don’t have any scheduled work such as admin it’s actually supposed to be… my free time. It is a huge challenge to keep this time entirely FREE because of cleaning, cooking and other responsibilities. I need to remind myself that some of this time has to remain for myself and my family or otherwise I get overworked and frustrated. I think I’m managing pretty well to spend some of this time on family time, reading, exercising, writing or whatever I need and want. There are days it doesn’t work perfectly but at least I have some system and many days I manage to follow it.

And what about you? Do you prefer a paper or digital calendar? Do you have a system that helps you with your to-do lists and tasks

goals, happiness, personal development, productivity, success

BETTERING YOURSELF – a healthier perspective

achievement, confident, free

I have always enjoyed reading and learning about different aspects which contribute to our personal development: motivation, consistency, passion, grit, being prepared to face and learn from failures, accepting that we make mistakes, etc. I think this list can be endless as personal growth is a multifaceted, lifelong process. However, we aren’t perfect creatures and we can’t adhere to all these hundreds of rules and meet all the requirements all the time because we wish to grow successfully throughout our life. There are thousands of pieces of advice out there on the internet, TV, in magazines – each tells us something different:

– “To be able to improve yourself you MUST get up at 4am!”

– “To achieve success you HAVE TO sleep for 7-8hrs a day and be ready and prepared, ahead of your competition, all the time”

– ”To change your habit for a better one you NEED TO eat healthier/meditate and exercise more/be more confident/ work when others sleep”

There are LOTS of pieces of advice as to what we should do and what we must do, and what we definitely should not be doing, to make sure we are better human beings. BETTER … but what does it really mean?

When is the moment when you know that now you are good enough? Nobody seems to be talking about that …

Where are the boundaries to make sure that we are not getting trapped into perfectionism?

We aren’t and can’t be PERFECT but on the other hand humans have this inner drive and desire towards bettering themselves constantly.

To tackle this problem, I believe that allowing ourselves time to reflect, review and consider our values, goals and plans is crucial. Otherwise it’s easy to forget what we wanted to achieve and what we are really aiming for, and stress too much about the process and try to do more and better, and faster.

It’s important to take care of your personal development indeed, but it shouldn’t mean joining the rat race. Let others be part of it. You don’t need to be better in every single area of your life. Life is not a marathon or a competition. It’s about the journey, the process, the very moments when you are here and now. Let’s enjoy it a bit more.

children, motherhood, parenting, productivity, well-being, work-life balance

When life and priorities change

It’s funny how productivity techniques work so fantastically well when you have a lot of time but just don’t really know how to organise yourself better, and how they fail to work when you are REALLY very busy.

Having a newborn is probably one of the most extreme circumstances when one lacks time, sleep, and a proper eating routine, suffers some memory problems and feels drained physically and mentally (especially when the baby has colic).

The great news is that I survived the terrible labour and that my baby is well!

The bad news is that, although a few weeks have passed since my son’s birth, I still don’t have a routine I’d find relatively stable and effective. Days are challenging, time passes incredibly quickly and I need to be very flexible. I feel I would like to devote a bit more time to my interests and exercising but working on wellbeing and parenting has become a priority right now.

In meantime I’ve been discovering some new activities and experiments I can do with my 4-year-old daughter. Some quality time for us is needed more than ever.

Have a look at some interesting ideas for children’s activities: here

Attention & concentration, book, books, career, goals, happiness, learning, motivation, personal development, planning, Productive Mondays, productivity, success, time management, time usage, Uncategorized, work-life balance

How to cut out all meaningless stuff?

Yellow and White Ceramic Coffee Mug on Brown Wooden Surface With Black Eyeglasses

There are many tempting things in the world!

Every week try to cut off or limit something that doesn’t matter much to you but takes up your time—it may be complaining, Facebook, TV, gossiping or worrying about the future. Don’t feel bad though if you procrastinate a bit sometimes; according to research this is normal and everyone does it. It’s important not to feel guilty about it and make sure that it doesn’t take too much of your time and attention.

It’s easy to get into meaningless chats or meet with negative people not because we really want to but because for some reason we feel we should. When you start to say NO to some invitations you may lose some friends. But then, are they real friends if they don’t understand your need to work on something important to you so you can’t hang out with them as much as you used to?

blur, close-up, device

The average adult person who has children has for themselves only around 2 hours a day. Due to lack of energy these 2 hours are often spent in front of the TV in the evenings. Think how you can organise this time differently. Surely you need to rest a bit but, to tell the truth, TV isn’t a good method for gaining more energy. Maybe you could allow only half an hour a day for TV (and occasionally watch a film, say at weekends) and spend the remaining time on some exercises, such as yoga from a YouTube channel.

Exercise is a very effective cure for fatigue.

Way too often we spend our time also on… looking for different things. Try to be organised and dedicate a week or a whole month to de-cluttering your house. Plan what you will do each day to tidy your stuff up. A method by Marie Kondo is very popular and helpful nowadays. Have you heard of it yet?

  • Try to find a place for everything in your home and group things together. Don’t keep coins or hairpins in a lot of different places at home. One type of item = one place at your home.
  • Organising your clothes (including the ones in the laundry and in any other place at home), on the same day works wonders. Put into a bin everything you haven’t used for a few years but think that you “might use it one day’. If you didn’t need something for 4 years, do you really think you will need it now or in the near future?
  • Many of your documents, notes, and other similar things also could go in the bin. Don’t deceive yourself; some of these things you will never use or need again!

Try a meaningless stuff diet and see how well it tastes! 😉

Attention & concentration, blogging, book, books, career, Efektywnosc, goals, grit, learning, motivation, personal development, planning, Productive Mondays, productivity, success, time management, Uncategorized, work-life balance

How to avoid distractions?

A simple distraction such as a notification (often not important at all!) on your mobile means that each time you lose your focus and, according to studies, need 4 to 15 minutes to concentrate and motivate yourself again to keep working effectively on your tasks!

It was found that office workers are distracted every 3 minutes on average!

Data from 2016 indicated that 3 out of 4 employers believe that every day an average employee loses 2 hours of work due to distractions. While you are doing your work, write down all the distractions that happen for a week or two and analyse them. Think what you could do to minimise or avoid them!

We get easily distracted when we are tired. Remember about taking regular breaks, going for a walk and catching some fresh air. Breathe, eat well, drink a lot of water and some green tea. These SIMPLE (but often neglected!) pieces of advice will help you to stay calmer, more focused and more patient.

If you can, and surely sometimes you can, turn your mobile off or change it to airplane mode.

Free stock photo of hands, coffee, iphone, smartphone

One of the greatest pieces of advice, although quite difficult to follow at first, is to get up earlier to avoid distractions: requests, phone calls, noise, notifications, and questions from others! You’d be amazed how much meaningful work can be done in the early morning hours. Don’t get up earlier to catch up with emails or to clean your home! Get up earlier to do something creative, something that’s meaningful for you, something that will give you exceptional results and will bring you closer to achieving your goals. Write, read, work on your business or project, for example. This is a precious time.

If you get up 1 hour earlier every day you will gain 7 extra hours for something that matters to you! How does that sound? Seven quiet precious hours. I had a long period of time when I was able to get up 2 hours earlier than usual. That’s 14 hours a week! Now while in advanced pregnancy I have had to change my schedule because of the need for more sleep. Remember, not every piece of advice will work the same for everyone but I can say that this tip which I read about in What the Most Successful People Do Before Breakfastby Laura Vanderkam (available here) made a huge improvement in my life.

Experts advise that to change your habit and make this morning routine easier, ideally, you should get up at the same time every single day. If you allow yourself to sleep longer at weekends, then you’ll feel that it’s more difficult to get up early during weekdays.

If you feel it’s too difficult to do this, maybe try a shorter period of time; for example, 30 mins extra in the morning—that will also make a difference. Just remember to make sure that you still can sleep 7-8 hours a day.

Some people like to have their Power Hour in the morning so they can feel they’ve achieved something before everyone else gets up. Power Hour means that you dedicate one hour where you put 100% effort into a dedicated project, activity or task. Or it may mean for  some people, for example: 20 mins spent on some creative work, 20 mins of reading and 20 mins of exercising. Check what will work best for you. Knowing that you achieve something early in the morning will make you more satisfied and put you in a more positive mood which will last for hours during the day.

career, happiness, money, motivation, performance, productivity, work

Does money motivate people – what’s the truth?

Does money buy happiness in your opinion?

If yes, to what extent? 

If not, why not?

Many years ago, before I got into psychology, I thought that money surely can motivate people to work better, more quickly and efficiently; and no matter what your job is that money can enhance performance.

Many of us are trying not to focus on material things too much, but sometimes it may be really challenging. We know or hear about people who are driven by fame, power and money, but they don’t always seem to be happier with their life.

There are actually many rich and famous people whose lives are far from ideal, although at first they may look fabulous: they have public recognition, fans, attend parties, and are able to afford houses and fantastic trips all over the world. Then when we look at someone’s life deeper, even though it seems full of blessings, it actually may be an empty and dark place filled with anxieties, depression or drugs.

The rich and famous sometimes can’t handle the social pressure, the expectations from the public and the high standards imposed by the industries they work in.

We often think … if we were rich the bad stuff and feelings surely wouldn’t happen to us and we would certainly know how to keep sane, responsible and in charge of our lives. We may think this but life isn’t as easy as it seems, even if one has money. Even the nicest and most noble people get lost and need to fight loneliness, cancer or depression. And sometimes they lose like in the case of Robin Williams and many others…

What have academic studies recently found out about the impact of money on our happiness and motivation?

According to the Harvard Business Review, studies show that, even if employees decided how much they earn for their work, they probably wouldn’t enjoy their work more!

The link between money and motivation or performance is much more complex than we think. Tim Judge and his colleagues analysed 120 pieces of research on this topic and concluded that there is actually a very weak link between money and job satisfaction.

“Employees earning salaries in the top half of our data range reported similar levels of job satisfaction to those employees earning salaries in the bottom-half of our data range.”

What’s interesting, and no matter how ridiculous it sounds, in non-physical jobs particularly, financial rewards can actually distract and demotivate people, and some tasks can be done even more slowly and less effectively than before!

Scientists believe that we should focus on our intrinsic motivation (own satisfaction) because it is a stronger predictor of our job satisfaction and/or performance.

Of course, research findings are only average and we need to remember that everyone is different and has different motives. Financial goals motivated by the pursuit of power or boosting our confidence (using the money for cosmetic surgeries, for example) will be a lot less rewarding than seeking a bigger income to meet needs related to security or family support.some-people-are-so-poor-all-they-have-is-money

For employers, a far better prediction of an employee’s job satisfaction is their personality traits rather than income:

“The more emotionally stable, extraverted, agreeable or conscientious people are, the more they tend to like their jobs (irrespective of their salaries)… but … the biggest organisational cause of disengagement is incompetent leadership. Thus, as a manager, it’s your personality that will have a significant impact on whether your employees are engaged at work, or not.”

If you are interested to find out more about this fascinating phenomenon, have a look at the Harvard Business Review article HERE

You may be interested in this great book too: Art of Money: A Life-Changing Guide to Financial Happiness by Bari Tessler available here

career, Efektywnosc, goals, grit, motivation, personal development, planning, Productive Mondays, productivity, success, time management, time usage, Uncategorized

Energy-draining forms of resting

design, desk, display

Yes, you read this correctly. Some activities seem to be helping us to relax but actually drain a lot of our energy because they need a great deal of attention and focus.

For example, using the Internet may seem like fun but as you know it’s a really huge time waster and energy and attention drainer! Funny videos on You Tube may feel like a great way to relax because they make you smile or laugh but it’s a bit like eating chocolate—it works only for a moment and after such a break you actually feel more tired.

The Apple company confirmed in 2016 that their device users unlock their phones 80 times a day on average. This means 6 to 8 times an hour! Sounds unbelievable, right? Make a simple experiment. You can check how much time you waste on your phone by using one of these apps: Checky, Menthal or the recently created AntiSocial. These apps will allow you to see a lot of different interesting information about your phone usage. For instance, AntiSocial will show you if you use your phone or social media more or less when compared with someone who has a similar demographic as you. Researchers advise the use of one of these apps for around 2 weeks to be able to see a more accurate reflection of your real habits.

It is important to be aware how much time we waste on the Internet or on our phone, especially when it’s associated with factors such as low self-esteem, depression, insomnia and, of course, contributes to our delaying or failing to achieve our personal goals.

Many of us say that we have NO TIME. Check the results of your phone, tablet and PC usage and think again – do you really lack time or can you use your time more effectively?

Spending time with SOME people is another activity which looks like a form of resting but may actually drain a lot of your energy. You perhaps don’t feel like meeting some people but at the same time you think you probably should see and speak to them (family friends; a colleague that you see once or twice a year because neither of you feel you should call each other more often; a work colleague that you don’t really like or can’t trust but you feel you should sit with them during lunch time). Meeting people just for the sake of it and having some meaningless conversations can be really energy draining. It is often more about being polite and pretending than being really interested in socialising or what another person wants to tell you.

Try a brisk walk, mindfulness, stretching, or reading a book instead! Did you know that only 6 minutes of reading can decrease your stress level by nearly 70%? 

If you think of different activities during your usual week you may find more things like that. Surely watching TV is one of the examples.

What activities actually make you feel better, more confident, stronger, more optimistic and creative? Think what things make you feel like you have more energy and do them WAY MORE OFTEN!

What about unimportant meaningless stuff—don’t waste your precious time on it. Don’t let others decide what may be good for you. Don’t do things just to satisfy others and just because something may look good. Often no-one will remember and care. You have only one precious life and really, you should live it the way you want to.

 

 

career, Efektywnosc, emails, goals, learning, personal development, planning, Productive Mondays, productivity, success, time management, time usage, Uncategorized, work, work-life balance

7 Worst Email Mistakes Everyone Makes

  1. Replying to emails,a well-known rule: “If it takes you 1-2 minutes, do it right away”. 

If you answer all your emails very quickly then before you manage to go through all of them you may sometimes start to get replies to your replies …which you’ve just managed to send…

Some emails just create more emails. It’s like a never-ending story. If something isn’t very clear or you think it may take a few emails being sent back and forth, it’s probably better to make a phone call (during the time when you have a block-phone-calls time planned of course!).

Use the batch processing technique. According to studies, you will be most productive if you check and reply to emails only 3x a day or if you can, even more rarely.

    2. Writing over-long emails.                 

It’s difficult to keep some replies short. It’s a bit like an art and we need to mindfully practise it, but once you decide that you want to write, say, a maximum of 4-5 sentences per email, it will work wonders.

3. Using shortcuts,short forms or abbreviations when they are not needed or not well known.

It may look like we don’t really have time to reply to the email — e.g. people in some companies write KR instead of Kind Regards. According to studies, many people feel that such emails look like the sender is lazy or unprofessional.

     4. Bad grammar or spelling.

Research carried out by psychologists from North Carolina State University showed that others, who don’t know us in person, judge us a great deal based on errors in emails. If we send emails with errors, others will perceive us as less intelligent and trustworthy!

     5. Using”Reply All”too often.

Most office workers are quite busy. Emails are a biggie on the distractions list and yet we are often unnecessarily cc-ed in emails that we don’t need to read. Sometimes we just need a one-word or one-line outcome instead of the whole email trail. Sometimes it may be good to make someone aware of something but people are very BUSY nowadays and many wouldn’t like to receive ping-pong emails… Before you click on “reply to all’ think twice if it’s really needed.

     6. Use your subject line PROPERLY.

If you have a query, don’t put Hi or Just a Quick Question in your subject line…  Sometimes it will delay a reply. Sometimes it causes real problems to find an old email quickly. Try to name things as specifically as possible in the email title, e.g. XQZ project – approval needed. Or maybe something like: Issue with payment for employee KR. Feb 2018.

    7. Marking not very important emails as urgent ones!

Oh, I know some people who overuse this so much. It’s not just annoying, it’s kind of painful for the eyes. A receptionist where I worked (I worked there only once every few weeks, by the way) added me to a circular list that was sent to all professionals in the building, in higher and lower positions, and then I started to get some emails from her… sometimes quite a lot of them, all marked as urgent:

  • “There is no milk in the fridge. It will be sorted out in an hour” – marked us urgent!
  • “There is a problem with the sink in one of the toilets on the first floor!” – marked as urgent!
  • “Has anyone seen a green pen somewhere in reception? It’s Katie’s! Please let me know if you did”. – also marked as urgent…

I’m busy, I mean BUSY, and I get all these urgent messages. Sometimes there are 10 or so in a day. Oh, sweet Lord, help me! It always interested me: How on earth has no-one told the receptionist yet to stop marking all her emails as urgent!

And a personal request to all bosses all over the world:

It’s great that you are able and happy to work at 11pm and then again at 2am and 4am. Fantastic. Congratulations on not needing any sleep but …

  • if you have employees who use work mobiles and don’t switch the sound off just in case of an emergency… or
  • if you know that your employee may skim the emails before getting to the office and get stressed with issues at work before even starting their shift …

please have mercy!

Just skimming emails (to see whether there is something super-urgent we should be aware of before entering the office!) can raise blood pressure and heart rate at the same time and it feels like we are working from 5am rather than 8 or 9am. It’s so difficult to forget about the distraction especially if we care about our jobs or want to be perceived as reliable workers. Please don’t… Why not leave the emails in the DRAFT folder and click SEND on them first thing in the morning when you start your shift? Surely, most of you don’t start your work with a meeting every single day and if you do you could send the pre-prepared emails minutes before the meeting from your mobile.

Have I missed anything? Please comment if you know of any other email-related sins people make?

career, Efektywnosc, goals, grit, learning, motivation, personal development, planning, Productive Mondays, productivity, success, time management, time usage, Uncategorized, work-life balance

JUST DO IT? WAIT!

action, air, balance

JUST DO IT – the famous phrase from NIKE’s advert has become popular in motivational posts, videos and speeches. Why wait? Stop thinking about it for ages. Stop procrastinating. Just do it! Right? No. Not really. Not always.

Some people tend to dwell too much on prep and planning stages or postpone things too much but taking actions mindlessly just to do something related to their goals is not the smartest move either.

You need to have an action plan; a good, well-thought-out action plan where you write down your goals, particular actions, steps and tasks.

Only 3% of adults actually write their goals down.

This is one of the reasons why over 90% of people fail working on their New Year resolutions by 15th January each year!

There have been a number of studies which indicate that people who write their goals down are 50% more successful in achieving what they plan.

You should always keep the note with your goals with you; for example, in your wallet. Why is it so important? If you keep your goals and action steps in your mind (especially if you have an active lifestyle):

  • you may forget about some of the goals or actions sometimes; an average human being has around 1,500 thoughts per minute – you can’t always ensure that your goals are kept on top of all these thoughts; often there is no energy & time for it
  • you may often feel that there are other more important or urgent things that are written, for example, in your emails
  • you won’t treat your personal goals as seriously as work or college/university-related assignments and projects (a lot of these are given to you in a written form or you are expected to write these things down!)

You need to come up with deadlines so your personal goals matter and are treated as any other, for example work goals. Once you have these important aspects sorted out then yes, take action!

And remember to book some time for reviewing your goals and plans because you will notice quickly what mistakes could be avoided, what works and what doesn’t, and what you can do to improve your working style.

Don’t JUST mindlessly DO IT!