Attitude is the KEY

I’ve started to exercise a little and drink a lot more water recently and this helps me to stay more positive and energetic for longer during the day. A friend of mine said that she would also like to start exercising to lose her post-pregnancy weight but I’ve noticed that quite often she feels overwhelmed, as though losing a bigger amount of weight while looking after two small children is almost like mission impossible.

I think that the first thing that bring us closer to reaching our goals is our ATTITUDE. Your mindset, attitude and outlook are more than critical in reaching your goals. Any goals that you set for yourself.

Without the right mindset and positive attitude you won’t ever start. Without them, what else will keep you motivated during your journey? How will you overcome any problems and challenges?

Try to not worry too much about the current situation if it isn’t the best and focus on what you can do to change this. Attitude can take you a long way. It can help you to “move mountains” and, as Robert T. Kiyosaki said in his book “Rich Dad Poor Dad”, remember that your thoughts are actually responsible for creating your life. You CAN live the life you want. You CAN do what you enjoy and achieve what you dream about.

The attitude is the key and this is emphasised by many successful people too.

You’ve probably heard or read some famous quotes, such as the one by Henry Ford:

“Whether you think you can or whether you think you can’t, you’re right.”

The best book I’ve ever read in the field of psychology, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol Dweck (available here), also stresses how the way you look at things and respond to different situations is important because this determines whether you will be (or rather allow yourself to be) a successful and happy human being.

Negative situations, bad circumstances, not enough resources (such as time or money) – that happens to EVERYONE in the world. EVERYONE. Yet, some people achieve a lot, even though it looks like everything is against them, even though they have no money and not much time etc. and some others choose (consciously or not) to use these unsatisfactory aspects and lack of resources as excuses.

An incredibly successful writer no-one had heard of around a decade ago, Haruki Murakami, had a full-time job and family, and hadn’t really much time for writing but enjoyed it so much that one day he decided he would spend 2 hours on writing every day after work. Now Haruki, whenever he decides to write a new book, gets up very early in the morning and spends 4-6 hours on writing. Every single day for a few weeks: 4-6 hours daily! Do you remember how energy draining and at the same time how rewarding it feels when you write a long essay? Haruki admits that spending so much time on writing his books is hard but without that he wouldn’t achieve his goals. And achieving goals is incredibly satisfying 😉 What’s interesting, although he is already 69, is that he enjoys running a lot and takes part in marathons. It helps to clear his mind, increase his energy and improve the creativity that is needed to write great books!

Image result for haruki murakami

Getting the right attitude is a crucial step before we decide what our priorities are and make plans!

You can do more than you think you can with a bit of hard work and consistency. You will need to get inspired and motivated. You will need to spend some time on your goals. You may need to make some sacrifices BUT remember that wherever you are right now, if you don’t know where to start, and if your situation looks overwhelming – you start with your attitude. You think of your outlook first.

How to improve your mindset and get the right attitude?

Try to keep all the negative thoughts away.

Try meditation.

Try to worry less.

Try to stay inspired and motivated by others and the things they create.

Try to connect/re-connect with nature as much and as often as you can.

Try exercising a bit every single day to stay energetic and positive for longer!

There is a lot you can do to improve your mindset and start working on your goals with the right attitude.

Just remember what the KEY is!

 

Does money motivate people – what’s the truth?

Does money buy happiness in your opinion?

If yes, to what extent? 

If not, why not?

Many years ago, before I got into psychology, I thought that money surely can motivate people to work better, more quickly and efficiently; and no matter what your job is that money can enhance performance.

Many of us are trying not to focus on material things too much, but sometimes it may be really challenging. We know or hear about people who are driven by fame, power and money, but they don’t always seem to be happier with their life.

There are actually many rich and famous people whose lives are far from ideal, although at first they may look fabulous: they have public recognition, fans, attend parties, and are able to afford houses and fantastic trips all over the world. Then when we look at someone’s life deeper, even though it seems full of blessings, it actually may be an empty and dark place filled with anxieties, depression or drugs.

The rich and famous sometimes can’t handle the social pressure, the expectations from the public and the high standards imposed by the industries they work in.

We often think … if we were rich the bad stuff and feelings surely wouldn’t happen to us and we would certainly know how to keep sane, responsible and in charge of our lives. We may think this but life isn’t as easy as it seems, even if one has money. Even the nicest and most noble people get lost and need to fight loneliness, cancer or depression. And sometimes they lose like in the case of Robin Williams and many others…

What have academic studies recently found out about the impact of money on our happiness and motivation?

According to the Harvard Business Review, studies show that, even if employees decided how much they earn for their work, they probably wouldn’t enjoy their work more!

The link between money and motivation or performance is much more complex than we think. Tim Judge and his colleagues analysed 120 pieces of research on this topic and concluded that there is actually a very weak link between money and job satisfaction.

“Employees earning salaries in the top half of our data range reported similar levels of job satisfaction to those employees earning salaries in the bottom-half of our data range.”

What’s interesting, and no matter how ridiculous it sounds, in non-physical jobs particularly, financial rewards can actually distract and demotivate people, and some tasks can be done even more slowly and less effectively than before!

Scientists believe that we should focus on our intrinsic motivation (own satisfaction) because it is a stronger predictor of our job satisfaction and/or performance.

Of course, research findings are only average and we need to remember that everyone is different and has different motives. Financial goals motivated by the pursuit of power or boosting our confidence (using the money for cosmetic surgeries, for example) will be a lot less rewarding than seeking a bigger income to meet needs related to security or family support.some-people-are-so-poor-all-they-have-is-money

For employers, a far better prediction of an employee’s job satisfaction is their personality traits rather than income:

“The more emotionally stable, extraverted, agreeable or conscientious people are, the more they tend to like their jobs (irrespective of their salaries)… but … the biggest organisational cause of disengagement is incompetent leadership. Thus, as a manager, it’s your personality that will have a significant impact on whether your employees are engaged at work, or not.”

If you are interested to find out more about this fascinating phenomenon, have a look at the Harvard Business Review article HERE

You may be interested in this great book too: Art of Money: A Life-Changing Guide to Financial Happiness by Bari Tessler available here